Fractal Dipole Antenna Communication System

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CRANE-102082
Short range secure communications can be performed using several methods, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. Laser communications are effective in providing a good quality secure communications, but require expensive tracking and pointing equipment to keep the lasers aligned, and atmospheric conditions or obstruction such as another passing ship can disrupt the communication. Satellite communications are effective but not efficient for short range communication. However, satellite communication signals can also be obstructed by atmospheric conditions. Satellite communication up-links are relatively secure however their down links can be easily intercepted. transceivers using radio frequency (RF) spectrum can be good for short range with minimal atmospheric conditions effect; however, RF signals can be easily jammed or intercepted. There is market space for a secure short range communication with a high data capacity that is not easily jammed or intercepted, is cost-effectively utilized with existing communication system, does not require a significant degree of maintenance, and that can be mass produced.

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division (NSWC Crane), has patented in U.S. Patent No. 9,184,805, a fractal dipole antenna for use in highly secure, short range communications systems. A fractal dipole antenna is capable of transmitting and/or receiving multiple frequency bands simultaneously, and of increasing bandwidth of each single band due to the fractal geometry. The fractal structure of the antenna gives rise to the electromagnetic behavior of the antenna. Embodiments of the invention could be used for a variety of applications e.g., unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs), ground teams, vehicles, ships, and sensor fusion applications.
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Utility Patent
United States
9,184,805
Nov 10, 2015
Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization
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