Dopamine Agonists

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Dopamine is a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system that has been implicated in numerous neurological disorders. For example, excess stimulation of dopamine may be linked to schizophrenia, whereas either excessive or insufficient functional dopaminergic activity may cause hypertension, narcolepsy, and other disorders including Parkinson's disease. The D1 receptor is a dopamine receptor subtype that may be a viable therapeutic target for dopamine-related pathologies. Accordingly, researchers have directed their efforts to design ligands that are selective D1 receptor agonists.

Researchers at Purdue University have developed new molecules that fully and selectively activate the dopamine D1 receptor. The compounds derived are useful for treating patients having a dopamine-related dysfunction of the central nervous system (CNS) as well as conditions in which peripheral dopamine receptors are involved. They are expected to be effective against Parkinson's disease, improving cognition, memory, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and related developmental disorders.

Advantages:
-Lead compound is 50 times more selective for D1 receptors than for D2L receptors
-Equipotent, but more selective than other D1 agonists
-Potentially effective treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease and other CNS disorders
-Orally bioavailable in animal models

Potential Applications:
-Medical/Healthcare
-Pharmaceutical industry
-Drug development
Aug 20, 2008
Utility Patent
United States
8,318,938
Nov 27, 2012

Feb 21, 2007
NATL-Patent
Canada
2,643,300
Nov 8, 2011

Feb 21, 2007
PCT-Patent
WO
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Feb 21, 2007
NATL-Patent
European Patent
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Feb 21, 2007
NATL-Patent
Australia
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Feb 21, 2007
NATL-Patent
New Zealand
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Feb 21, 2006
Provisional-Patent
United States
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Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization
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