Selective Capture and Identification of Bacteria

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Rapid identification of infectious pathogens is crucial in limiting the spread of contagious diseases. Unfortunately, current tests for most pathogens require hours or days of processing time. Antibody-based detection strategies have shown faster testing times, but become obsolete when the pathogen mutates its antibody binding sites. With the emergence of increasingly virulent strains of common pathogens, there is a need for new strategies with rapid turnaround times and the ability to detect mutated strains.

Purdue University researchers have developed a novel technique for selective capture and identification of pathogenic bacteria using immutable ligands. These are pathogen-specific ligands that the disease-causing organism must bind to in order to remain virulent. Examples of immutable ligands include host cell surface molecules that the pathogen must bind to in order to infect its host and nutrient molecules that the microbe must internalize to survive. This method first immobilizes the immutable ligand onto a chip. When the chip is exposed to its matching pathogen, binding occurs. The chip can then be quantitatively evaluated using image processing algorithms, which are not only fast and accurate, but can also be used in a multiplex approach where a sample can be screened for a wide variety of pathogens simultaneously.

Advantages:
-Rapid multiplex test results
-Detection invulnerable to pathogen mutations

Potential Applications:
-Biotechnology
-Toxin Detection
-Medical/Healthcare
Apr 4, 2013
NATL-Patent
United States
9,250,238
Feb 2, 2016

Jun 24, 2011
PCT-Patent
WO
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Jun 24, 2011
NATL-Patent
Australia
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Jun 24, 2011
NATL-Patent
Canada
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Jun 24, 2011
NATL-Patent
European Patent
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Jun 25, 2010
Provisional-Patent
United States
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Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization
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