Fuel-Flexible Combustion of Different Biodiesel Blends and Feedstocks

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The demand for biodiesel has been increasing rapidly in recent years; 700 million gallons were produced in 2008, 35 times more than just 5 years ago. Biodiesel is an attractive fuel for several reasons. It is renewable and can be produced domestically from a variety of sources including soybeans, sunflower seeds, and used frying oils. Biodiesel can be used in its pure form (B100) or blended with conventional diesel fuel. In addition, biodiesel generally results in lower particulate matter (PM) emissions. However, biodiesel does have some disadvantages, which limit its competitiveness with conventional diesel fuel. One example is its use in unmodified engines typically results in higher smog-generating nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions.

Researchers at Purdue University have developed a closed-loop control strategy for eliminating biodiesel-induced NOx emissions and reducing fuel consumption, while retaining significant particulate matter reductions. Using only stock sensors and requiring no additional calibration effort, the engine control module (ECM) can utilize existing closed-loop control variables to optimize fuel combustion. It can mitigate additional NOx emissions and maintain low particulate matter emissions from biodiesel and biodiesel blends.

Advantages:
-Reduced petroleum dependence
-Reduced greenhouse gas emissions
-Renewable fuel
-Minimizes fuel consumption and increases in NOx emissions

Potential Applications:
-Alternative fuel for diesel engines
Oct 9, 2012
NATL-Patent
United States
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Dec 31, 2010
PCT-Patent
WO
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Dec 31, 2010
NATL-Patent
Brazil
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Dec 31, 2009
Provisional-Patent
United States
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