Ericsson Cycle Heat Pump

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A refrigeration machine or heat pump can be defined as any device that moves heat from a low temperature source to a high temperature sink. Depending on the specific need, the heat absorbed in the low temperature source can be utilized to provide cooling, the heat rejected to the sink can be used to provide heating, or both could be used simultaneously. However, current applications of refrigeration require the use of toxic refrigerants that are harmful to the environment or are flammable.

Researchers at Purdue University have developed a heat pump system that is a practical application of the Ericsson cycle. It can be constructed primarily using existing equipment and technologies used by the HVACR industry. It has a high theoretical and attainable coefficient of performance, operates at pressures similar to existing heat pump equipment, and uses environmentally benign refrigerants.

The system is scalable and can be used for refrigeration, comfort cooling, and heating. Cryogenic applications are also possible. The machine can also be designed to operate as a heat engine using external combustion or virtually any other heat source.

Advantages:
-Does not use toxic refrigerants
-Scalable
-High coefficient of performance

Potential Applications:
-HVAC Industry
-Manufacturing
Aug 24, 2006
United States
7,401,475
Jul 22, 2008

Aug 24, 2006
PCT-Patent
WO
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Aug 24, 2005
Provisional-Patent
United States
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Provisional-Patent
United States
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Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization
1801 Newman Road
West Lafayette, IN 47906

Phone: (765) 588-3475
Fax: (765) 463-3486
Email: otcip@prf.org